INTERVIEW WITH… Felix LupaINTERVIEW WITH… Felix Lupa

Researched by Roberta Pastore

FELIX LUPA

http://www.felixlupa.com/

When did you start a passion for the photography?

 I was born in 1972 in the Ukraine, then of the Soviet Union. I was acquainted with photography at a very early age, as my father used to develop and print his pictures at home. In 1978 I emigrated together with my parents from the Soviet Union to Israel. The rest of our family stayed on in the Soviet Union. A new,and quite different life began for us.

---_00050

Absorption in the new country was rather hard .Warm and sheltered childhood in the fold of loving grand -parents , uncles and aunts gave way to a race for survival. Conditions in the new country obliged my parents to work  at two jobs in order to safeguard their future in their new country. I thus found myself alone at home from morning to evening, and being a curious and inquisitive child of six, I preferred to wander around in the streets, learn the new language, get to know people of all sorts, and, generally, learning to make my own way in life. Soon I got to know the street, its laws, and the people who inhabited it. The schooling I got during those early years rendered me a great service later in life. At the age of 24 with quite a mileage in photography I decided to register in a photography school.  I wanted to sort myself out, to see where I was going with my life, and with photography. By then it was already clear to me that photography was for me neither a hobby , nor a profession , but rather a way of life. In a short course of several months I excelled in composition studies, laboratory work, black and white etc. On graduating I was straight away recruited as an instructor in the same school. After a year in that job I decided to go out to explore the world in the company of my camera For five years I visited and worked in a number of countries.

With the help of my camera(Nikon F3-HP) I managed to gain access into the lives of many people wherever I went. I gained experience in a number of fields of photography, but soon enough I realized that I must focus on the field in which I was best, namely documenting people, their lives and their environment. For several years I worked for various magazines in Israel, as well as in other  countries. Nowadays I devote all my free time to “street photography” ,and to its advancement in Israel.

DSC07468

What was your first camera?

When, as a child, I started photographing, it was with a rangefinder camera. Later on I experienced with all kinds, makes, and formats that came about and were available. But out of this prolonged and varied experimentation I came to realize that, for me the rangefinder camera was (and still is) the best system to work with: you work with the least of technological intervention in the creative process, and with the least conspicuous camera. It is true that there is no such thing as the “perfect camera”, and that you have to learn to live with limitations and to make the best out of your machine. But with all this in mind I am convinced that, for me, the best option is a small, quiet, precise and dependable camera with a great choice of first class glass, which would serve me faithfully for many years. My preference to stick with film has probably to do with the time I started getting interested in photography and with my early experience with analogical photography and dark room work. The present so called “digital age” is impatient with those who prefer to work slowly and deliberately, and is calibrated to cater to immediate satisfactions. To my mind, this is rather unfortunate. It overpowers our commonsense and blurs our senses which are so important for photography in the intoxicating environment of the street.

DSCF6476

What is photography to you? And what should not be instead?

Photography for me is much more than the means to record impressions from my personal life ,or the life of the society in which I live.For me photography serves as a central, mental, balancing point in the midst of all other things that demand my attention in daily life. It is a haven, an island of sanity in which I am always glad to take refuge from an insane world.

The very moment I take up my camera I feel commitment, and a sense of responsibility. Holding my camera I feel that I am required to be more attentive, more sensitive, more determined. It is as if the camera in my hands obliges me to think, imagine, improvise, be more creative, as if, for a brief magical moment, it brings out in me all those good qualities which make up the best character of man. Photography has always had, ever since my childhood, a kind of mystical power over me. For me the camera was that sparkling, eye-catching device, which imbues those who hold it with supernatural powers, the power to catch a magical moment with a little push of a button, show everybody that one can stop the flow of time, look again and again at a chosen situation, recreating and re-experiencing the emotions of a unique moment.

Even today, many years and experiences later, this feeling of magic has not faded. I still feel the excitement of photography and thank my luck for being able to experience the marvel of holding a camera, and sharing with others these feelings of wonder and excitement.

 Which masters of photography inspires you? 

There is no photographer whose work has influenced me. I have always taken my inspiration from the street and the people in it, and not from books or other photographers. For this reason I do not have at home even one book of photographs.

 DSC01167

IMG_4037

L1013356

What is your favorite technique?

The way a street photographer thinks and acts is quite like a hunter’s; the more experienced and accomplished he/she is, his distance from his object will tend to get shorter. His chief tool for capturing interesting situations in the street is his ability to surprise and his persistence in the face of failures. For my part, I use to go out in the street with just one camera and one lens, preferably ultra-wide. This obliges me to get as close as possible to the scene. I think this is an excellent method to improve one’s self confidence and courage when one strolls in the “urban jungle”. There is no doubt that having to cope with closeness to strange people may have good effects also in one’s private life. It is inevitable that you will experience some friction with people, but even this is a useful experience; you are obliged to find some creative solutions to this, and, in the course of time, you develop a positive attitude which will make people accept you, and even like your presence among them, which, eventually, translates into good, intimate pictures.

I use two approaches to the process of creation. As they complement each other they result in a state of permanent readiness for any eventuality. One is the way of “defense” the other the way of “initiative”.

“Defense”: when I move in the street sometimes I find myself being “attacked” by surprising , unexpected, situations.  Being alert to this kind of situation I am always ready to meet the challenge, when such opportunities come my way.

In such cases the nature of reaction is defensive. One is wide open to the environment. There is no time for thought. You act instinctively, and all you want is to “absorb” the situation and disappear.

“Initiative”: ” initiated” approach to street photography is like going on a hunting trip. It involves all known methods of the hunter.

Going to the “hunting field” requires mental preparation. One has to clear one’s mind of all irrelevant concerns and bothers. The street tells its stories using its own wavelength. All one needs to do is receive and synchronize with it. All senses are sharpened up, the body is tuned up and alert, the mind is creative, and adrenalin level is high. In this state every action will be thought out, planned, and precisely timed, every situation is examined in depth, and a method of action is initiated- diversion, camouflage, sneaking, shooting and disappearing, all methods  known to every street photographer,” hunters of the streets”.

What is common to both approaches is the habit of holding the camera in hand, switched on, and ready to shoot.  As long as you are in the street, the camera should not be in its protective bag, or hanging on your neck nor on your shoulder. It should be in your hand ready for every eventuality. This is basic, hard incontestable experience. Tested and proven.

L1002690

L1003622

Why do street photography?

I actually began to do street photography before I even knew there was such a genre. Like most photographers, in my time I used to photograph landscape, portraits, macro and even flowers in vases. It was, however, when I started taking photos of people in the street that I knew that this was exactly what I loved and wanted to do. Challenge and satisfaction in photographing people are very great. This kind of photography usually brings out your best, it teaches you a lot about others, but even more about yourself.

L1001570_1

What is your relationship with the street and the people who are in your shots?

As what concerns me most is investigating and recording the life of society, it is essential to reveal and expose the state of things as they are.

This search for truth may be done by an investigation in depth, looking into the smallest details, scratching the upper layers, which does indeed lead to penetrating into the citizen’s life and viewing the depths of his/her soul, so to speak.

The truth may be reached in either of two ways: the longer or the shorter.

The longer way involves the elements I have just mentioned, and requires a great deal of time in order to reach full intimacy with the “subject”, or the person to be photographed.

The shorter way includes all the “hunting techniques” I mentioned earlier- decoy, sneaking, camouflage, shooting and evading, all in order to get as close to the “subject” as possible in his/her moment of truth.

In my work I combine the two methods, in order to reach a truth only I and the person photographed share.

Whatever the method we choose, there is no place for shame or fear in this kind of photography work.

 Researched by Roberta Pastore

FELIX LUPA

http://www.felixlupa.com/

When did you start a passion for the photography?

 I was born in 1972 in the Ukraine, then of the Soviet Union. I was acquainted with photography at a very early age, as my father used to develop and print his pictures at home. In 1978 I emigrated together with my parents from the Soviet Union to Israel. The rest of our family stayed on in the Soviet Union. A new,and quite different life began for us.

---_00050

Absorption in the new country was rather hard .Warm and sheltered childhood in the fold of loving grand -parents , uncles and aunts gave way to a race for survival. Conditions in the new country obliged my parents to work  at two jobs in order to safeguard their future in their new country. I thus found myself alone at home from morning to evening, and being a curious and inquisitive child of six, I preferred to wander around in the streets, learn the new language, get to know people of all sorts, and, generally, learning to make my own way in life. Soon I got to know the street, its laws, and the people who inhabited it. The schooling I got during those early years rendered me a great service later in life. At the age of 24 with quite a mileage in photography I decided to register in a photography school.  I wanted to sort myself out, to see where I was going with my life, and with photography. By then it was already clear to me that photography was for me neither a hobby , nor a profession , but rather a way of life. In a short course of several months I excelled in composition studies, laboratory work, black and white etc. On graduating I was straight away recruited as an instructor in the same school. After a year in that job I decided to go out to explore the world in the company of my camera For five years I visited and worked in a number of countries.

With the help of my camera(Nikon F3-HP) I managed to gain access into the lives of many people wherever I went. I gained experience in a number of fields of photography, but soon enough I realized that I must focus on the field in which I was best, namely documenting people, their lives and their environment. For several years I worked for various magazines in Israel, as well as in other  countries. Nowadays I devote all my free time to “street photography” ,and to its advancement in Israel.

DSC07468

What was your first camera?

When, as a child, I started photographing, it was with a rangefinder camera. Later on I experienced with all kinds, makes, and formats that came about and were available. But out of this prolonged and varied experimentation I came to realize that, for me the rangefinder camera was (and still is) the best system to work with: you work with the least of technological intervention in the creative process, and with the least conspicuous camera. It is true that there is no such thing as the “perfect camera”, and that you have to learn to live with limitations and to make the best out of your machine. But with all this in mind I am convinced that, for me, the best option is a small, quiet, precise and dependable camera with a great choice of first class glass, which would serve me faithfully for many years. My preference to stick with film has probably to do with the time I started getting interested in photography and with my early experience with analogical photography and dark room work. The present so called “digital age” is impatient with those who prefer to work slowly and deliberately, and is calibrated to cater to immediate satisfactions. To my mind, this is rather unfortunate. It overpowers our commonsense and blurs our senses which are so important for photography in the intoxicating environment of the street.

DSCF6476

What is photography to you? And what should not be instead?

Photography for me is much more than the means to record impressions from my personal life ,or the life of the society in which I live.For me photography serves as a central, mental, balancing point in the midst of all other things that demand my attention in daily life. It is a haven, an island of sanity in which I am always glad to take refuge from an insane world.

The very moment I take up my camera I feel commitment, and a sense of responsibility. Holding my camera I feel that I am required to be more attentive, more sensitive, more determined. It is as if the camera in my hands obliges me to think, imagine, improvise, be more creative, as if, for a brief magical moment, it brings out in me all those good qualities which make up the best character of man. Photography has always had, ever since my childhood, a kind of mystical power over me. For me the camera was that sparkling, eye-catching device, which imbues those who hold it with supernatural powers, the power to catch a magical moment with a little push of a button, show everybody that one can stop the flow of time, look again and again at a chosen situation, recreating and re-experiencing the emotions of a unique moment.

Even today, many years and experiences later, this feeling of magic has not faded. I still feel the excitement of photography and thank my luck for being able to experience the marvel of holding a camera, and sharing with others these feelings of wonder and excitement.

 Which masters of photography inspires you? 

There is no photographer whose work has influenced me. I have always taken my inspiration from the street and the people in it, and not from books or other photographers. For this reason I do not have at home even one book of photographs.

 DSC01167

IMG_4037

L1013356

What is your favorite technique?

The way a street photographer thinks and acts is quite like a hunter’s; the more experienced and accomplished he/she is, his distance from his object will tend to get shorter. His chief tool for capturing interesting situations in the street is his ability to surprise and his persistence in the face of failures. For my part, I use to go out in the street with just one camera and one lens, preferably ultra-wide. This obliges me to get as close as possible to the scene. I think this is an excellent method to improve one’s self confidence and courage when one strolls in the “urban jungle”. There is no doubt that having to cope with closeness to strange people may have good effects also in one’s private life. It is inevitable that you will experience some friction with people, but even this is a useful experience; you are obliged to find some creative solutions to this, and, in the course of time, you develop a positive attitude which will make people accept you, and even like your presence among them, which, eventually, translates into good, intimate pictures.

I use two approaches to the process of creation. As they complement each other they result in a state of permanent readiness for any eventuality. One is the way of “defense” the other the way of “initiative”.

“Defense”: when I move in the street sometimes I find myself being “attacked” by surprising , unexpected, situations.  Being alert to this kind of situation I am always ready to meet the challenge, when such opportunities come my way.

In such cases the nature of reaction is defensive. One is wide open to the environment. There is no time for thought. You act instinctively, and all you want is to “absorb” the situation and disappear.

“Initiative”: ” initiated” approach to street photography is like going on a hunting trip. It involves all known methods of the hunter.

Going to the “hunting field” requires mental preparation. One has to clear one’s mind of all irrelevant concerns and bothers. The street tells its stories using its own wavelength. All one needs to do is receive and synchronize with it. All senses are sharpened up, the body is tuned up and alert, the mind is creative, and adrenalin level is high. In this state every action will be thought out, planned, and precisely timed, every situation is examined in depth, and a method of action is initiated- diversion, camouflage, sneaking, shooting and disappearing, all methods  known to every street photographer,” hunters of the streets”.

What is common to both approaches is the habit of holding the camera in hand, switched on, and ready to shoot.  As long as you are in the street, the camera should not be in its protective bag, or hanging on your neck nor on your shoulder. It should be in your hand ready for every eventuality. This is basic, hard incontestable experience. Tested and proven.

L1002690

L1003622

Why do street photography?

I actually began to do street photography before I even knew there was such a genre. Like most photographers, in my time I used to photograph landscape, portraits, macro and even flowers in vases. It was, however, when I started taking photos of people in the street that I knew that this was exactly what I loved and wanted to do. Challenge and satisfaction in photographing people are very great. This kind of photography usually brings out your best, it teaches you a lot about others, but even more about yourself.

L1001570_1

What is your relationship with the street and the people who are in your shots?

As what concerns me most is investigating and recording the life of society, it is essential to reveal and expose the state of things as they are.

This search for truth may be done by an investigation in depth, looking into the smallest details, scratching the upper layers, which does indeed lead to penetrating into the citizen’s life and viewing the depths of his/her soul, so to speak.

The truth may be reached in either of two ways: the longer or the shorter.

The longer way involves the elements I have just mentioned, and requires a great deal of time in order to reach full intimacy with the “subject”, or the person to be photographed.

The shorter way includes all the “hunting techniques” I mentioned earlier- decoy, sneaking, camouflage, shooting and evading, all in order to get as close to the “subject” as possible in his/her moment of truth.

In my work I combine the two methods, in order to reach a truth only I and the person photographed share.

Whatever the method we choose, there is no place for shame or fear in this kind of photography work.

 

Masters of street photography – Vivian Dorothea MaierMasters of street photography – Vivian Dorothea Maier

Written and researched by Carlo Traina

Vivian Dorothea Maier

(New York 01.02.1926 – 21.04. 2009)

Along the road you can meet the whole of humanity, without recognizing or noticing it. Everything that escapes from the addicted and distracted everyday look, but not from the look and lens of the street-photographers, more often than not even more anonymous than their own subject.

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It is quite curious that today we know Vivian Maier only thanks to an estate agent from Illinois , John Mallof that – an amateur photographer himself, looking for photographic material for the preparation of a book about the Chicago neighbourhoods – in 2007 bought a stock of old negatives (about 40.000), sold at an auction together with the furniture of an old lady who was into financial troubles. That old lady was Vivian Maier, that for her whole life had been shooting as a mere pastime over 100.000 photos (with about 15.000 negatives never developed) kept jealously hidden from the eyes of others. Her images – taken mainly in New York and Chicago – show the average Americans on the road and streets of shopping, with a sad look in their eyes, women wearing hats, the demolition of historical monuments in the name of development, some of the most beloved places in Chicago, the invisible lives of various groups of people, the indigents.

Precisely because of her reserve, and thanks to this desire to photograph exclusively for herself, the biography of Vivian is not as rich in details and episodes as that of other Masters of Photography.

Undated, New York

1950s, Chicago, IL

September 13, 1953, Empire State Building, New York, NY

May 10, 1953, New York, NY

Born on the first of February 1926 in New York, from France mother and Austrian father, she lived her first years in France, but she come back to the United States in the 50′ and she lived for some years in New York acting as a saleswoman in a candy store. Since the forties she moved to Chicago. At the end of the forties she began shooting with a modest Kodak Brownie Box 6×9, an amateurish camera with a single shutter speed , no focus control and no control over aperture.

A woman that did not like to talk, that wore male clothes and shoes, great hats and had always the camera hanging from her neck; that is how the salesmen of CHICAGO CENTRAL CAMERA, an historical shop, described her.

On 1952 Vivian finally bought a Rolleiflex 6×6 and her shooting style started to develop. Her talent is similar to the one of the most important figures of the American Street Photography, photographers like Lisette Model , Helen Levitt, Diane Arbus and Garry Winogrand.
Her photographs betray an affinity towards the poor, probably due to the emotional relationship that Vivian feels towards those who were forced to struggle to get by. To survive in fact Vivian worked as a nanny at some families, especially for the three children of a rich family, who then saved her in old age, when – extremely poor – they would take care of her as a second mother, paying her the rent of an apartment, among other things.

At the end of the ’50 she decided to pass to color photography, using 35 mm films, Kodak Ektachrome and several models of Rolleiflex (3.5 T , 3.5 F, 2.8c , Automat) but also a Leica IIIc, a Ihagee Exacta , a Zeiss Contarex and several other reflex cameras.

1954, New York, NY

August 12, 1954, New York, NY

The use of colour made alive what was not clearly visible in her work before and her shots would become more abstract, as the passing of time. The people slowly crawled out of her photos and were substituted by objects , like newspapers and graffiti.

Vivian Maier died in 2008 , but thanks to the work of Maloof her photos are still alive and kicking on Flickr  and on the website vivianmaier.com , che Maloof did open to make known to fans and critics the life and the shots of the “nanny-photographer”, and, most important thing to answer to two important questions still open : “Who was Vivian Maier and what there is behind her incredible vision?”

East 108th Street. September 28, 1959, New York, NY

1955, New York, NY

http://www.vivianmaier.com/
http://vivianmaier.blogspot.it/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/chicagohistory/sets/72157631424543584/Written and researched by Carlo Traina

Vivian Dorothea Maier

(New York 01.02.1926 – 21.04. 2009)

Lungo la strada si può incontrare l’intera umanità, senza riconoscerla o notarla. Tuttaquella che sfugge all’occhio assuefatto e distratto del quotidiano, ma non agli sguardi eagli obiettivi degli street-photographer, spesso più anonimi dei loro soggetti

VM19XXW04205-01-MC

Sicuramente è curioso che oggi conosciamo Vivian Maier solo grazie all’agente immobiliare dell’Illinois John Maloof che – fotografo per passione, ed in cerca di materiale fotografico per la scrittura di un libro sui quartieri di Chicago – comprò nel 2007 uno stock di vecchi negativi (40.000 circa) messi all’asta insieme ai mobili appartenenti ad una anziana signora in difficoltà economica Quella signora era appunto Vivian Maier, che nella sua vita aveva scattato per puro passatempo più di 100.000 foto (oltre a 15.000 scatti non sviluppati) gelosamente nascoste agli occhi degli altri. Le sue immagini – riprese prevalentemente a New York e Chicago – mostrano gli americani medi per le strade dello shopping con uno sguardo triste, donne con i cappellini, la demolizione di monumenti storici per un nuovo sviluppo, alcuni dei luoghi più amati di Chicago, le vite invisibili dei vari gruppi di persone, gli indigenti. Proprio a causa della sua riservatezza, e di questo desiderio di fotografare esclusivamente per se stessa, la biografia di Vivian non è ricca di particolari ed episodi come quella di altri Maestri della Fotografia.

September 13, 1953, Empire State Building, New York, NY Undated, New York 1950s, Chicago, IL May 10, 1953, New York, NY

Nata a New York il 1 febbraio 1926 da madre francese e padre austriaco, Viviantrascorre i suoi primi anni in Francia, ma torna negli Stati Uniti negli anni ’30 e vive per alcuni anni a New York lavorando come commessa in un negozio di caramelle. Dagli anni ’40 in poi si trasferisce a Chicago. Alla fine degli anni ‘40 anni inizia a fotografare per gioco con una modesta Kodak Brownie box 6×9, una macchina amatoriale con una sola velocità dell’otturatore, nessun controllo di messa a fuoco e nessuna manopola di apertura.Una donna che non ama parlare, veste abiti e scarpe da uomo, indossa grandi cappelli ed è perennemente con la fotocamera penzoloni intorno al suo collo: così la ricordano gli impiegati nello storico negozio di apparecchiature fotografiche di Chicago Central Camera.Nel 1952 Vivian acquista finalmente una Rolleiflex 6×6 ed il suo stile comincia aprendere forma.Il suo talento è paragonabile a quello delle figure più importanti dell’American street photography, come Lisette Model, Helen Levitt, Diane Arbus e Garry Winogrand.

Le sue foto tradiscono un’affinità verso i poveri, probabilmente a causa di una parentela emotiva che Vivian sente nei confronti di coloro che sono costretti a lottare per tirare avanti.Per sopravvivere infatti Vivian fa la baby-sitter presso alcune famiglie, soprattutto a tre bambini di una ricca famiglia borghese, che poi la salveranno in vecchiaia, quando – estremamente povera – si prenderanno cura di lei come una seconda madre, pagandole tra l’altro l’affitto di un appartamento.Verso la fine degli anni ’50 decide di passare alla fotografia a colori, utilizzando pellicole di 35mm Kodak Ektachrome, e diversi tipi di Rolleiflex (3.5T, 3.5F, 2.8c, Automat) ma anche una Leica IIIc, una Ihagee Exakta, una Zeiss Contarexe varie altre fotocamere reflex.

1954, New York, NY August 12, 1954, New York, NY

L’uso del colore rende vivo ciò che prima non era visibile nel suo lavoro, e le sue foto diventano più astratte, come il passare del tempo. Le persone lentamente strisciano fuori dalle sue foto e vengono sostituite con oggetti, giornali e graffiti.Vivian Maier muore nel 2008, ma grazie all’impegno di Maloof le sue foto continuano a vivere su Flickr  e sul sito vivianmaier.com che Maloof ha aperto per fare conoscere agli appassionati e ai critici la vita e gli scatti della “bambinaia-fotografa”, e soprattutto per tentare di rispondere alle due questioni rimaste aperte: “Chi era Vivian Maier , e cosa c’è dietro la sua straordinaria visione ?

East 108th Street. September 28, 1959, New York, NY 1955, New York, NY

http://www.vivianmaier.com/
http://vivianmaier.blogspot.it/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/chicagohistory/sets/72157631424543584/

INTERVIEW WITH… Vineet VohraINTERVIEW WITH… Vineet Vohra

Written and researched by Roberta Pastore

VINEET VOHRA

Born in Delhi in 1973 , i spent my childhood under the guidance of my father & my father’s elder brother , they are the biggest source of inspiration for me , they both taught me what i possibly couldn’t learn from any school or college . One being a applied artist & the other a noted sculptor so I got the best of both the worlds ,did graduation from prestigious Delhi college of Arts in applied arts & specialization in photography .

51

When did you start a passion for the photography?

I started photography at a very early age and at that anything to everything was my subject , from Flora to fauna , humans to animals , I would shoot anything that caught my attention.

What was your first camera?

My first camera was Minolta x-700

What is photography to you? And what should not be instead?

To me photography is a journey & I travel everyday , I am learning & unlearning everyday ,I thrive to improve everyday . Life in General which is so unexpected i try to be as honest through my lens as I can .I try to synthesize between human elements & the environment & my main focus is how to make ordinary moments look extraordinary .I think everyone of us should get involved with photography coz it gives more than one can ever imagine .

DSC_6362Which masters of photography inspires you?

I love to see works of lot of photographers (famous & not so famous) over & over again but I feel ,I should be out shooting instead of watching these pics , so I have my favorites but only STREETS inspire me & not the photographers .

What is the photo that struck you the most of a great photographer of the story?

I love Bresson’s work a lot , his image -Sunday on the banks of river Marne really fascinates me .

 What is your favorite technique?

One fixed focal length & f11

photo-2 DSCF8372 DSCF1189 DSC_6920Why do street photography?

Generally street photography gets confused with photojournalism , in a way they both are documentary photography but to my own knowledge I feel it must tell a story ,story has to be told even if it’s meaning is hidden, it’s about how people are , it should be SIMPLE .

 What is your best shot and what does it represent for you?

I am still struggling to get a shot that I can fall in love with .

2 1What is your relationship with the street and the people who are in your shots?

to be honest , I feel like a pickpocketer , my relation with them is often very superficial or non existent , I see a subject, take a picture , say thank you & move on, but then while doing a story I spend lot of time in that area , get to know them & make them comfortable of my presence.

3

© Cesare Salvadeo 06/03/14 (photo of the week)© Cesare Salvadeo 06/03/14 (foto della settimana)

“It’s about reacting to what you see, without preconceptions. You can find pictures from photographs everywhere, simply observe things their arrangement, interested in everything around us and take care of humanity and the human comedy. “In this quote by Eliott Erwitt find enclosed the ironic style of shooting Cesare Salvadeo in which a group of men is intention in taking a picture, while a woman with an eye to making distracted and elsewhere, holds one of the photographers.
The beauty of this is then the subject being photographed by photographers who do not see, in the multitude of photographers, and the woman ignored and distracted. In this photo, “our” photographer (a little ‘says Erwitt) has ignored the subject that sparked the other photographers and addressed them.

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«Si tratta di reagire a ciò che si vede, senza preconcetti. Si possono trovare immagini da fotografare ovunque, basta semplicemente osservare le cose la loro disposizione, interessarsi a ciò che ci circonda e occuparsi dell’umanità e della commedia umana». In questa citazione di Eliott Erwitt ritroviamo racchiuso lo stile ironico dello scatto di Cesare Salvadeo nel quale un gruppo di uomini è intento nello scatto di una fotografia, mentre una donna con fare distratto e lo sguardo rivolto altrove, trattiene uno dei fotografi.

 

La bellezza di questa immagine sta quindi nel soggetto fotografato dai fotografi che non si vede, nella moltitudine di fotografi, e nella donna ignorata e distratta. In questa foto il “nostro” fotografo (un po’ come dice Erwitt) ha ignorato il soggetto che ha scatenato gli altri fotografi e si è rivolto ad essi.

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