Category Archives: Interview with…

INTERVIEW WITH… Felix LupaINTERVIEW WITH… Felix Lupa

Researched by Roberta Pastore

FELIX LUPA

http://www.felixlupa.com/

When did you start a passion for the photography?

 I was born in 1972 in the Ukraine, then of the Soviet Union. I was acquainted with photography at a very early age, as my father used to develop and print his pictures at home. In 1978 I emigrated together with my parents from the Soviet Union to Israel. The rest of our family stayed on in the Soviet Union. A new,and quite different life began for us.

---_00050

Absorption in the new country was rather hard .Warm and sheltered childhood in the fold of loving grand -parents , uncles and aunts gave way to a race for survival. Conditions in the new country obliged my parents to work  at two jobs in order to safeguard their future in their new country. I thus found myself alone at home from morning to evening, and being a curious and inquisitive child of six, I preferred to wander around in the streets, learn the new language, get to know people of all sorts, and, generally, learning to make my own way in life. Soon I got to know the street, its laws, and the people who inhabited it. The schooling I got during those early years rendered me a great service later in life. At the age of 24 with quite a mileage in photography I decided to register in a photography school.  I wanted to sort myself out, to see where I was going with my life, and with photography. By then it was already clear to me that photography was for me neither a hobby , nor a profession , but rather a way of life. In a short course of several months I excelled in composition studies, laboratory work, black and white etc. On graduating I was straight away recruited as an instructor in the same school. After a year in that job I decided to go out to explore the world in the company of my camera For five years I visited and worked in a number of countries.

With the help of my camera(Nikon F3-HP) I managed to gain access into the lives of many people wherever I went. I gained experience in a number of fields of photography, but soon enough I realized that I must focus on the field in which I was best, namely documenting people, their lives and their environment. For several years I worked for various magazines in Israel, as well as in other  countries. Nowadays I devote all my free time to “street photography” ,and to its advancement in Israel.

DSC07468

What was your first camera?

When, as a child, I started photographing, it was with a rangefinder camera. Later on I experienced with all kinds, makes, and formats that came about and were available. But out of this prolonged and varied experimentation I came to realize that, for me the rangefinder camera was (and still is) the best system to work with: you work with the least of technological intervention in the creative process, and with the least conspicuous camera. It is true that there is no such thing as the “perfect camera”, and that you have to learn to live with limitations and to make the best out of your machine. But with all this in mind I am convinced that, for me, the best option is a small, quiet, precise and dependable camera with a great choice of first class glass, which would serve me faithfully for many years. My preference to stick with film has probably to do with the time I started getting interested in photography and with my early experience with analogical photography and dark room work. The present so called “digital age” is impatient with those who prefer to work slowly and deliberately, and is calibrated to cater to immediate satisfactions. To my mind, this is rather unfortunate. It overpowers our commonsense and blurs our senses which are so important for photography in the intoxicating environment of the street.

DSCF6476

What is photography to you? And what should not be instead?

Photography for me is much more than the means to record impressions from my personal life ,or the life of the society in which I live.For me photography serves as a central, mental, balancing point in the midst of all other things that demand my attention in daily life. It is a haven, an island of sanity in which I am always glad to take refuge from an insane world.

The very moment I take up my camera I feel commitment, and a sense of responsibility. Holding my camera I feel that I am required to be more attentive, more sensitive, more determined. It is as if the camera in my hands obliges me to think, imagine, improvise, be more creative, as if, for a brief magical moment, it brings out in me all those good qualities which make up the best character of man. Photography has always had, ever since my childhood, a kind of mystical power over me. For me the camera was that sparkling, eye-catching device, which imbues those who hold it with supernatural powers, the power to catch a magical moment with a little push of a button, show everybody that one can stop the flow of time, look again and again at a chosen situation, recreating and re-experiencing the emotions of a unique moment.

Even today, many years and experiences later, this feeling of magic has not faded. I still feel the excitement of photography and thank my luck for being able to experience the marvel of holding a camera, and sharing with others these feelings of wonder and excitement.

 Which masters of photography inspires you? 

There is no photographer whose work has influenced me. I have always taken my inspiration from the street and the people in it, and not from books or other photographers. For this reason I do not have at home even one book of photographs.

 DSC01167

IMG_4037

L1013356

What is your favorite technique?

The way a street photographer thinks and acts is quite like a hunter’s; the more experienced and accomplished he/she is, his distance from his object will tend to get shorter. His chief tool for capturing interesting situations in the street is his ability to surprise and his persistence in the face of failures. For my part, I use to go out in the street with just one camera and one lens, preferably ultra-wide. This obliges me to get as close as possible to the scene. I think this is an excellent method to improve one’s self confidence and courage when one strolls in the “urban jungle”. There is no doubt that having to cope with closeness to strange people may have good effects also in one’s private life. It is inevitable that you will experience some friction with people, but even this is a useful experience; you are obliged to find some creative solutions to this, and, in the course of time, you develop a positive attitude which will make people accept you, and even like your presence among them, which, eventually, translates into good, intimate pictures.

I use two approaches to the process of creation. As they complement each other they result in a state of permanent readiness for any eventuality. One is the way of “defense” the other the way of “initiative”.

“Defense”: when I move in the street sometimes I find myself being “attacked” by surprising , unexpected, situations.  Being alert to this kind of situation I am always ready to meet the challenge, when such opportunities come my way.

In such cases the nature of reaction is defensive. One is wide open to the environment. There is no time for thought. You act instinctively, and all you want is to “absorb” the situation and disappear.

“Initiative”: ” initiated” approach to street photography is like going on a hunting trip. It involves all known methods of the hunter.

Going to the “hunting field” requires mental preparation. One has to clear one’s mind of all irrelevant concerns and bothers. The street tells its stories using its own wavelength. All one needs to do is receive and synchronize with it. All senses are sharpened up, the body is tuned up and alert, the mind is creative, and adrenalin level is high. In this state every action will be thought out, planned, and precisely timed, every situation is examined in depth, and a method of action is initiated- diversion, camouflage, sneaking, shooting and disappearing, all methods  known to every street photographer,” hunters of the streets”.

What is common to both approaches is the habit of holding the camera in hand, switched on, and ready to shoot.  As long as you are in the street, the camera should not be in its protective bag, or hanging on your neck nor on your shoulder. It should be in your hand ready for every eventuality. This is basic, hard incontestable experience. Tested and proven.

L1002690

L1003622

Why do street photography?

I actually began to do street photography before I even knew there was such a genre. Like most photographers, in my time I used to photograph landscape, portraits, macro and even flowers in vases. It was, however, when I started taking photos of people in the street that I knew that this was exactly what I loved and wanted to do. Challenge and satisfaction in photographing people are very great. This kind of photography usually brings out your best, it teaches you a lot about others, but even more about yourself.

L1001570_1

What is your relationship with the street and the people who are in your shots?

As what concerns me most is investigating and recording the life of society, it is essential to reveal and expose the state of things as they are.

This search for truth may be done by an investigation in depth, looking into the smallest details, scratching the upper layers, which does indeed lead to penetrating into the citizen’s life and viewing the depths of his/her soul, so to speak.

The truth may be reached in either of two ways: the longer or the shorter.

The longer way involves the elements I have just mentioned, and requires a great deal of time in order to reach full intimacy with the “subject”, or the person to be photographed.

The shorter way includes all the “hunting techniques” I mentioned earlier- decoy, sneaking, camouflage, shooting and evading, all in order to get as close to the “subject” as possible in his/her moment of truth.

In my work I combine the two methods, in order to reach a truth only I and the person photographed share.

Whatever the method we choose, there is no place for shame or fear in this kind of photography work.

 Researched by Roberta Pastore

FELIX LUPA

http://www.felixlupa.com/

When did you start a passion for the photography?

 I was born in 1972 in the Ukraine, then of the Soviet Union. I was acquainted with photography at a very early age, as my father used to develop and print his pictures at home. In 1978 I emigrated together with my parents from the Soviet Union to Israel. The rest of our family stayed on in the Soviet Union. A new,and quite different life began for us.

---_00050

Absorption in the new country was rather hard .Warm and sheltered childhood in the fold of loving grand -parents , uncles and aunts gave way to a race for survival. Conditions in the new country obliged my parents to work  at two jobs in order to safeguard their future in their new country. I thus found myself alone at home from morning to evening, and being a curious and inquisitive child of six, I preferred to wander around in the streets, learn the new language, get to know people of all sorts, and, generally, learning to make my own way in life. Soon I got to know the street, its laws, and the people who inhabited it. The schooling I got during those early years rendered me a great service later in life. At the age of 24 with quite a mileage in photography I decided to register in a photography school.  I wanted to sort myself out, to see where I was going with my life, and with photography. By then it was already clear to me that photography was for me neither a hobby , nor a profession , but rather a way of life. In a short course of several months I excelled in composition studies, laboratory work, black and white etc. On graduating I was straight away recruited as an instructor in the same school. After a year in that job I decided to go out to explore the world in the company of my camera For five years I visited and worked in a number of countries.

With the help of my camera(Nikon F3-HP) I managed to gain access into the lives of many people wherever I went. I gained experience in a number of fields of photography, but soon enough I realized that I must focus on the field in which I was best, namely documenting people, their lives and their environment. For several years I worked for various magazines in Israel, as well as in other  countries. Nowadays I devote all my free time to “street photography” ,and to its advancement in Israel.

DSC07468

What was your first camera?

When, as a child, I started photographing, it was with a rangefinder camera. Later on I experienced with all kinds, makes, and formats that came about and were available. But out of this prolonged and varied experimentation I came to realize that, for me the rangefinder camera was (and still is) the best system to work with: you work with the least of technological intervention in the creative process, and with the least conspicuous camera. It is true that there is no such thing as the “perfect camera”, and that you have to learn to live with limitations and to make the best out of your machine. But with all this in mind I am convinced that, for me, the best option is a small, quiet, precise and dependable camera with a great choice of first class glass, which would serve me faithfully for many years. My preference to stick with film has probably to do with the time I started getting interested in photography and with my early experience with analogical photography and dark room work. The present so called “digital age” is impatient with those who prefer to work slowly and deliberately, and is calibrated to cater to immediate satisfactions. To my mind, this is rather unfortunate. It overpowers our commonsense and blurs our senses which are so important for photography in the intoxicating environment of the street.

DSCF6476

What is photography to you? And what should not be instead?

Photography for me is much more than the means to record impressions from my personal life ,or the life of the society in which I live.For me photography serves as a central, mental, balancing point in the midst of all other things that demand my attention in daily life. It is a haven, an island of sanity in which I am always glad to take refuge from an insane world.

The very moment I take up my camera I feel commitment, and a sense of responsibility. Holding my camera I feel that I am required to be more attentive, more sensitive, more determined. It is as if the camera in my hands obliges me to think, imagine, improvise, be more creative, as if, for a brief magical moment, it brings out in me all those good qualities which make up the best character of man. Photography has always had, ever since my childhood, a kind of mystical power over me. For me the camera was that sparkling, eye-catching device, which imbues those who hold it with supernatural powers, the power to catch a magical moment with a little push of a button, show everybody that one can stop the flow of time, look again and again at a chosen situation, recreating and re-experiencing the emotions of a unique moment.

Even today, many years and experiences later, this feeling of magic has not faded. I still feel the excitement of photography and thank my luck for being able to experience the marvel of holding a camera, and sharing with others these feelings of wonder and excitement.

 Which masters of photography inspires you? 

There is no photographer whose work has influenced me. I have always taken my inspiration from the street and the people in it, and not from books or other photographers. For this reason I do not have at home even one book of photographs.

 DSC01167

IMG_4037

L1013356

What is your favorite technique?

The way a street photographer thinks and acts is quite like a hunter’s; the more experienced and accomplished he/she is, his distance from his object will tend to get shorter. His chief tool for capturing interesting situations in the street is his ability to surprise and his persistence in the face of failures. For my part, I use to go out in the street with just one camera and one lens, preferably ultra-wide. This obliges me to get as close as possible to the scene. I think this is an excellent method to improve one’s self confidence and courage when one strolls in the “urban jungle”. There is no doubt that having to cope with closeness to strange people may have good effects also in one’s private life. It is inevitable that you will experience some friction with people, but even this is a useful experience; you are obliged to find some creative solutions to this, and, in the course of time, you develop a positive attitude which will make people accept you, and even like your presence among them, which, eventually, translates into good, intimate pictures.

I use two approaches to the process of creation. As they complement each other they result in a state of permanent readiness for any eventuality. One is the way of “defense” the other the way of “initiative”.

“Defense”: when I move in the street sometimes I find myself being “attacked” by surprising , unexpected, situations.  Being alert to this kind of situation I am always ready to meet the challenge, when such opportunities come my way.

In such cases the nature of reaction is defensive. One is wide open to the environment. There is no time for thought. You act instinctively, and all you want is to “absorb” the situation and disappear.

“Initiative”: ” initiated” approach to street photography is like going on a hunting trip. It involves all known methods of the hunter.

Going to the “hunting field” requires mental preparation. One has to clear one’s mind of all irrelevant concerns and bothers. The street tells its stories using its own wavelength. All one needs to do is receive and synchronize with it. All senses are sharpened up, the body is tuned up and alert, the mind is creative, and adrenalin level is high. In this state every action will be thought out, planned, and precisely timed, every situation is examined in depth, and a method of action is initiated- diversion, camouflage, sneaking, shooting and disappearing, all methods  known to every street photographer,” hunters of the streets”.

What is common to both approaches is the habit of holding the camera in hand, switched on, and ready to shoot.  As long as you are in the street, the camera should not be in its protective bag, or hanging on your neck nor on your shoulder. It should be in your hand ready for every eventuality. This is basic, hard incontestable experience. Tested and proven.

L1002690

L1003622

Why do street photography?

I actually began to do street photography before I even knew there was such a genre. Like most photographers, in my time I used to photograph landscape, portraits, macro and even flowers in vases. It was, however, when I started taking photos of people in the street that I knew that this was exactly what I loved and wanted to do. Challenge and satisfaction in photographing people are very great. This kind of photography usually brings out your best, it teaches you a lot about others, but even more about yourself.

L1001570_1

What is your relationship with the street and the people who are in your shots?

As what concerns me most is investigating and recording the life of society, it is essential to reveal and expose the state of things as they are.

This search for truth may be done by an investigation in depth, looking into the smallest details, scratching the upper layers, which does indeed lead to penetrating into the citizen’s life and viewing the depths of his/her soul, so to speak.

The truth may be reached in either of two ways: the longer or the shorter.

The longer way involves the elements I have just mentioned, and requires a great deal of time in order to reach full intimacy with the “subject”, or the person to be photographed.

The shorter way includes all the “hunting techniques” I mentioned earlier- decoy, sneaking, camouflage, shooting and evading, all in order to get as close to the “subject” as possible in his/her moment of truth.

In my work I combine the two methods, in order to reach a truth only I and the person photographed share.

Whatever the method we choose, there is no place for shame or fear in this kind of photography work.

 

INTERVIEW WITH… Vineet VohraINTERVIEW WITH… Vineet Vohra

Written and researched by Roberta Pastore

VINEET VOHRA

Born in Delhi in 1973 , i spent my childhood under the guidance of my father & my father’s elder brother , they are the biggest source of inspiration for me , they both taught me what i possibly couldn’t learn from any school or college . One being a applied artist & the other a noted sculptor so I got the best of both the worlds ,did graduation from prestigious Delhi college of Arts in applied arts & specialization in photography .

51

When did you start a passion for the photography?

I started photography at a very early age and at that anything to everything was my subject , from Flora to fauna , humans to animals , I would shoot anything that caught my attention.

What was your first camera?

My first camera was Minolta x-700

What is photography to you? And what should not be instead?

To me photography is a journey & I travel everyday , I am learning & unlearning everyday ,I thrive to improve everyday . Life in General which is so unexpected i try to be as honest through my lens as I can .I try to synthesize between human elements & the environment & my main focus is how to make ordinary moments look extraordinary .I think everyone of us should get involved with photography coz it gives more than one can ever imagine .

DSC_6362Which masters of photography inspires you?

I love to see works of lot of photographers (famous & not so famous) over & over again but I feel ,I should be out shooting instead of watching these pics , so I have my favorites but only STREETS inspire me & not the photographers .

What is the photo that struck you the most of a great photographer of the story?

I love Bresson’s work a lot , his image -Sunday on the banks of river Marne really fascinates me .

 What is your favorite technique?

One fixed focal length & f11

photo-2 DSCF8372 DSCF1189 DSC_6920Why do street photography?

Generally street photography gets confused with photojournalism , in a way they both are documentary photography but to my own knowledge I feel it must tell a story ,story has to be told even if it’s meaning is hidden, it’s about how people are , it should be SIMPLE .

 What is your best shot and what does it represent for you?

I am still struggling to get a shot that I can fall in love with .

2 1What is your relationship with the street and the people who are in your shots?

to be honest , I feel like a pickpocketer , my relation with them is often very superficial or non existent , I see a subject, take a picture , say thank you & move on, but then while doing a story I spend lot of time in that area , get to know them & make them comfortable of my presence.

3

INTERVIEW WITH… Chulsu KimINTERVIEW WITH… Chulsu Kim

Written and researched by Amos Farnitano

Chulsu Kim

Born in Japan, raised in Japan, but Korean.Think habitually, and intended to express themselves from the photograph. I have photographed to take care of intuition and sensitivity. Order to pursue real, I will continue to take the street.

1794599_379506192189426_1091618079_n

 When did you start a passion for the photography?                               The passion for the photography is begun when I bought the  iPhone  three years ago.

What was your first camera?                                                                                         My first camera is iPhone

What is photography to you? And what should not be instead?           For me is means to express themselves.

10006633_379506225522756_1578573747_n

Which masters of photography inspires you?                                                   All IG friends ( Instagram Comunity)

What is your favorite technique?                                                                          5- Is a freeshot

 Why do street photography?                                                                                    The street photography because you are looking for real at all         times

1620385_379506242189421_206034218_n

What is your best shot and what does it represent for you?                Represent for me sensitivity and very natural posture

What is your relationship with the street and the people who are in your shots?                                                                                                                          The relationship with the street and the people who are in my shots is that they are the sound of each other sensitivity

1621961_379506255522753_501949128_nWritten and researched by Amos Farnitano

Chulsu Kim

Born in Japan, raised in Japan, but Korean.Think habitually, and intended to express themselves from the photograph. I have photographed to take care of intuition and sensitivity. Order to pursue real, I will continue to take the street.

1794599_379506192189426_1091618079_n

 

1 – When did you start a passion for the photography?

1-The passion for the photography is begun when I bought the iPhone three years ago.
2 – What was your first camera?

2-My first camera is iPhone
3 – What is photography to you? And what should not be instead?

3-For me is means to express themselves.

10006633_379506225522756_1578573747_n

 

4 – Which masters of photography inspires you?

4-All IG friends ( Instagram Comunity)

 
5 – What is your favorite technique?

5- Is a Freeshot
6 – Why do street photography?

6- The street photography because you are looking for real at all times

1620385_379506242189421_206034218_n

 

7 – What is your best shot and what does it represent for you?

7- Represent for me sensitivity and very natural posture
8 – What is your relationship with the street and the people who are in your shots?

8- The relationship with the street and the people who are in my shots is that they are the sound of each other sensitivity

1621961_379506255522753_501949128_n

interview with… Eduard FrancesIntervista con…Eduard Frances

EDUARD FRANCES
Written and researched by Fabrizio Pannone, Raffaele Montepaone, Roberta Pastore

Interview with ... Eduard Frances

Born in Xativa (Valencia), Spain. I am a self-taught photographer who started taking photos in 1987. I began learning about analog photography technics and chemistry laboratory. I also learnt making my own chemical formulas and emulsified paper. I have created copies in Fine Art in baryta paper in a limited edition and I have spent a big part of my time working on Ansel Adams zone system. My obsession: To take a photo which has a life of its own in Black and white. Streets are my favorite place where I try to catch with my eyes other people’s life and show it to my audience. I don’t like the manipulation of images and I never use HDR or similar technics. My passion for black and white photography and the streets makes me study the image and its light and shade to cause the greatest visual impact in my pictures.  I love the streets, this is my style and a big part of my work. My photograph  “La Pelu” is a snapshot, taken with a Nikon FM2 and Trix 400 film and printed with D76.

1 – When did you start a passion for the photography?
I started taking photos in 1987.
2 – What was your first camera?
The equipment I used in my beginning in order was the following: Nikkormat, FM2, F301, F90X,ContaxG1 and Leica M6 in 6X6 Hasselblad format. I have used many different lenses but I only usewide-angle lens nowadays.
3 – What is photography to you? And what should not be instead?
For me, photography is feelings and soul. Where one parte is about the technique and other is about soul. Capturing the life and being able to leave a historic document. On the other hand, photographyshouldn’t consist in manupulating photographs like HDR
pelu copia

4 – Which masters of photography inspires you?
One of my favorite photographers was Ansel Adams and I practiced a lot of landscape photographyusing his zones system. Once I started to feel the street I changed my style immediately as I realizedhow important is to capture this world and its people.
5 – What is the photo that struck you the most of a great photographer of the story?
For me, there isn’t one exclusive photography that I can consider “the best”. There are a lot of good pictures, but the one that I admire is “The miliciano” from Robert Capa took at the Spanish Civil War.

Miradas en el tranvia copia 4

6 – What is your favorite technique?
The zone system, that I took from Ansel Adams.
7 – Why do street photography?
Because I want to leave my testimony to future generations and that they can see passing the time.
8 – What is your best shot and what does it represent for you?
This is what I consider my best picture. It represents life, simple has that. It’s reality.

Pensador copia 5

1653700_614803848573018_816525228_n

1796500_614809238572479_540644918_nEDUARD FRANCES
Written and researched by Fabrizio Pannone, Raffaele Montepaone, Roberta Pastore

Interview with ... Eduard Frances

Born in Xativa (Valencia), Spain. I am a self-taught photographer who started taking photos in 1987. I began learning about analog photography technics and chemistry laboratory. I also learnt making my own chemical formulas and emulsified paper. I have created copies in Fine Art in baryta paper in a limited edition and I have spent a big part of my time working on Ansel Adams zone system. My obsession: To take a photo which has a life of its own in Black and white. Streets are my favorite place where I try to catch with my eyes other people’s life and show it to my audience. I don’t like the manipulation of images and I never use HDR or similar technics. My passion for black and white photography and the streets makes me study the image and its light and shade to cause the greatest visual impact in my pictures.  I love the streets, this is my style and a big part of my work. My photograph  “La Pelu” is a snapshot, taken with a Nikon FM2 and Trix 400 film and printed with D76.

1 – When did you start a passion for the photography?
I started taking photos in 1987.
2 – What was your first camera?
The equipment I used in my beginning in order was the following: Nikkormat, FM2, F301, F90X,ContaxG1 and Leica M6 in 6X6 Hasselblad format. I have used many different lenses but I only usewide-angle lens nowadays.
3 – What is photography to you? And what should not be instead?
For me, photography is feelings and soul. Where one parte is about the technique and other is about soul. Capturing the life and being able to leave a historic document. On the other hand, photographyshouldn’t consist in manupulating photographs like HDR
pelu copia

4 – Which masters of photography inspires you?
One of my favorite photographers was Ansel Adams and I practiced a lot of landscape photographyusing his zones system. Once I started to feel the street I changed my style immediately as I realizedhow important is to capture this world and its people.
5 – What is the photo that struck you the most of a great photographer of the story?
For me, there isn’t one exclusive photography that I can consider “the best”. There are a lot of good pictures, but the one that I admire is “The miliciano” from Robert Capa took at the Spanish Civil War.

Miradas en el tranvia copia 4

6 – What is your favorite technique?
The zone system, that I took from Ansel Adams.
7 – Why do street photography?
Because I want to leave my testimony to future generations and that they can see passing the time.
8 – What is your best shot and what does it represent for you?
This is what I consider my best picture. It represents life, simple has that. It’s reality.

Pensador copia 5

1653700_614803848573018_816525228_n

1796500_614809238572479_540644918_n